What We’re Reading: 2020 Geospatial Annual Report from TNC

By Abby Smith on January 27, 2021

2020 wasn’t easy for anyone involved in monitoring conservation work, given restrictions on travel and field visits - but we’re inspired to see how our partners rose to the challenge. A number of these innovative approaches are highlighted in the 2020 Geospatial Annual Report & Map Book released by The Nature Conservancy. Reflecting on both the importance of diversity in the geospatial technology field and the wide array of applications for remote sensing, this resource is full to the brim with fascinating case studies. From habitat availability for endangered mammals to tracking coral reef conditions to urban tree inventories, the report makes a strong case for the role of spatial data in informing both conservation policy and action.

We’re proud to be mentioned as a TNC partner for remote conservation property monitoring, both in the US and abroad. Our work in the Valdivian Coastal Reserve is a great example of how remote monitoring can help optimize resources and scale up monitoring. Located in a temperate rainforest in Chile, the Valdivian Coastal Reserve spans nearly 150,000 acres and hosts a range of species that depend on the protection of this habitat, meaning that preventing land conversion and development is critical.

As the TNC Chile team states:

Lens is enabling the use of commercial satellite imagery to increase the efficiency and effectiveness of land monitoring and stewardship over time...it has provided new insights regarding changes to the landscape, facilitating the detection of easement violations not visible during in-person monitoring as well as encroaching issues from adjacent properties. This has allowed us to mitigate safety issues on hazardous or hard to reach properties.

We’re grateful to be playing a part in the critical conservation efforts TNC is leading across the world to protect the lands that sustain us all.

Compare mode illustrating the progress of restoration work by TNC to restore native forest in the Valdivian Coastal Reserve after removing eucalyptus. The image on the left is from Maxar (0.5m) and was captured 12/14/2016 as restoration work was underway but impaired due to wildlife, and the image on the right comes from Airbus (0.5m) captured 12/29/2019 showcases the same area after years of promoting native forest regeneration. Compare mode illustrating the progress of restoration work by TNC to restore native forest in the Valdivian Coastal Reserve after removing eucalyptus. The image on the left is from Maxar (0.5m) and was captured 12/14/2016 as restoration work was underway but impaired due to wildlife, and the image on the right comes from Airbus (0.5m) captured 12/29/2019 showcases the same area after years of promoting native forest regeneration.